Loving Day 2018

Today marks the 51st anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia. This decision struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in sixteen U.S. states, marking the end of a legal ban on interracial marriages.

Richard Loving and Mildred Jeter were a multiracial couple from Virginia who married in 1958 and were subsequently arrested for breaking the law, according to Virginia’s 1924 “Act to Preserve Racial Integrity.” The Lovings fled to Washington, D.C. where they fought the decision. The Supreme Court ruled to strike all remaining anti-miscegenation laws on June 12th 1967, and the Lovings eventually returned to Virginia where they began a family.

If you would like to celebrate Loving Day with MRN, consider the following options:

 

 

 

 

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NCORE 2018 & MRN

National Conference on Race and Ethnicity in American Higher Education

Join the Multiracial Network at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity held this year in New Orleans, Louisiana!

At this year’s conference there are several programs, sessions, and special features on Multiraciality.

We hope you can join us! Check the Guidebook app for room locations!

https://ncore.ou.edu/en/ncore-2018-nola/programming/

Wednesday, May 30– 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
2010: Intergenerational Conversation of Scholars on Multiracial/Mixed Race Identity Session Track: Intersectionality, Identities and Discussions
Experience Level: All Levels

After about 25 years of scholarship, Multiracial/Mixed Race identity theories have progressed from being non-linear to being dynamic, fluid, and not monolithic. Scholars in interdisciplinary fields such as Sociology and Higher Education have brought new insights and contributions to identity research that helps us to understand the complexity of Multiracial/Mixed Race identity development. While the literature on Multiracial identity continues to bring more nuanced perspectives on the Mixed-Race experience, this intergenerational conversation will explore the following: Where is the future of mixed race/multiracial identity heading next? How do intergenerational scholars take into consideration previous research and how does this influence present day multiracial identity theories? This session will review past and present Multiracial/Mixed Race Identity theories spanning different generations of multiracial scholars. Through this conversation, we will engage participants in small and large group

discussion. As we wrestle with these questions, we will also consider how multiracial identity theories have not yet connected identity development to systems of oppression and racial justice. Overall, this presentation will benefit any participant who is interested in learning more about where the past and present scholarship on multiracial identity is heading from an intergenerational scholar perspective.

PRESENTER(S):
Victoria K. Malaney Brown, PhD Candidate University of Massachusetts Amherst & Director of Academic Integrity, Columbia University in the City of New York

Reginald Daniel, PhD, Professor, Department of Sociology University of California, Santa Barbara

Sy Stokes, MSEd, Doctoral Student, Higher Education University of Southern California — Los Angeles, CA

Charmaine Lietzau Wijeyesinghe, EdD, Consultant and Author, Social Justice and Organizational Development — Delmar, NY

Wednesday, May 30– 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
2222: Can My DNA Tell Me Who I Am? Multiple Perspectives on Direct-to-Consumer Ancestry Testing and Implications for Higher Education
Session Track: Race and Social Justice in Higher Education
Experience Level: Intermediate

Direct-to-consumer DNA Ancestry testing is becoming increasingly popular. From advertisements enticing consumers to “Discover if you’re part Scandinavian, West African, or maybe Native American”, to commercials promising the discovery of one’s “true” identity, these tests are undoubtedly being utilized by college students and educators. But can they really tell us who we are? This session engages this question from multiple theoretical and disciplinary perspectives and explores controversies in the usage of these technologies for higher education institutions. Examples of institutions that have actively engaged such testing include researchers at Cornell University, who in February 2011 launched a “Genetic Ancestry Project” where a random sample of 200 undergraduates received DNA testing to learn about “their ancestors’ human origins and migrations”, and West Chester University’s decade-old “DNA Discussion Project” which uses DNA ancestry testing to engage the campus in discussions of diversity. Yet these tests have also been critiqued for potentially perpetuating biological notions of race. Further, there are dangers of utilizing these tests for supporting fraudulent ethnic claims. Do the potential benefits in being able to claim a particular identity and kinship with a particular group of people outweigh the dangers? Participants will engage in critical reflection on DNA ancestry testing, which ultimately offers a complicated window into a deep quest for identity, belonging, and authenticity.

 

PRESENTER(S):
Kathleen Fitzgerald, PhD, Diversity Educator, Sociology Moving Beyond Diversity — New Orleans, LA

Myra Washington, PhD, Assistant Professor, Communication & Journalism University of New Mexico — Albuquerque, NM

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs The Ohio State University — Columbus, OH

Reginald Daniel, PhD, Professor, Department of Sociology University of California, Santa Barbara

 

Wednesday, May 30– 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
2418: Multiracial Aikido: Building a Community for Multiracial Students Session Track: Race and Social Justice in Higher Education
Experience Level: Intermediate

How do we fight for racial justice in a monoracial campus conversation? How do we heal and understand our experiences as individuals who may identify with two or more races on our campuses? What resources or exercises are available to be more inclusive? In this session we will explore a process of expanding options for students who identify as 2 or more races, having a space to increase understanding of the complexity of multiraciality on our campuses. By highlighting two campus initiatives, the Multiracial Connection group and the Multiracial Aikido program at Oregon State University, this session illuminates the complexity of monoracial dialogues, data, and spaces. We will engage participants using interactive storytelling activities to practice a tool for developing community among multiracial students, staff, and faculty. Our work is grounded in the notion of praxis, or the interplay between reflection/theory and action (Freire, 1970, 2012). We integrate theories of critical mixed race studies and aikido principles with our practical work with students, as well as faculty and staff. How this is manifested in more concrete terms is the use of innovation, deeply listening, engaging creativity, and taking time to think, reflect, and then act. By focusing on the interactions between staff- led initiatives and student-centered approaches to community building, this session highlights what campus culture change could truly look like when reimagined through a multiracial lens. The target audience is intermediate level of experience.

PRESENTER(S):
Sabrina T. Kwist, EdD, Dean of Equity and Inclusion, Los Medanos College — Pittsburg, CA

Charlene Cecilia Martinez, M.Ed., Associate Director of Integrative Learning, Diversity & Cultural Engagement Oregon State University — Corvallis, OR

Stephanie Naree Shippen, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist, Counseling and Psychological Services Oregon State University — Corvallis, OR

 

 Wednesday, May 30th from 12:15-1:15pm

Multiracial Caucus

There will be a Caucus meeting on in Marlborough A on the Second Level of the Hilton Riverside New Orleans co-facilitated by Mark Dawson & Lisa Meier.

 

Thursday, May 31– 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
3214: Critical Mixed Race Studies Comes of Age: Building Multiracial Inclusion into the Curriculum Session Track: Global, Multicultural and Transnational issues
Experience Level: All Levels

As a nascent field, Critical Mixed Race Studies is concerned with transdisciplinary, transnational, and transracial analyses of institutionalization of social, cultural, and political orders based on dominant conceptions of race. CMRS addresses local and global systemic injustice rooted in systems of racialization. This session discusses whether there is, or should be, a need to incorporate multiraciality more explicitly in the classroom. If there is a need, how then can educators, administrators, and researchers build more inclusive classrooms and curricula around multiraciality?

PRESENTER(S):

Mitzi Uehara Carter, PhD, Visiting Professor, Global Sociocultural Studies Florida International University — Palmetto Bay, FL

Ashley Howard, PhD, Assistant Professor/Director of African and African American Studies, Loyola University — New Orleans, LA

Naliyah Kaya, PhD, Assistant Professor, Sociology Montgomery College — Bladensburg, MD

Myra Washington, PhD, Assistant Professor, Communication & Journalism University of New Mexico — Albuquerque, NM

Thursday, May 31– 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
3208: Should I Check that Box? Categorical Imperatives within Changing Sociopolitical Landscapes Session Track: Intersectionality, Identities and Discussions
Experience Level: Intermediate

Demographics are collected on college students from admissions to graduation, and everywhere in between. A common question for multiracial students when encountering these questions is “Which box(es) should I check?” But increasingly, there are questions about whether a question should even be asked/answered. While “post-racial” fantasies might envision a time when racial and data questions would not be necessary, we know their importance for continuing to document and track racialized disparities in access and outcomes. But what about other identities? Alongside increasing numbers of racially “unknown” students who opt out of identifying, there are movements to add more boxes to better capture diverse students across gender and sexual orientation. This session explores contentions around “box-checking” for multiple identities and backgrounds. From documenting sexual orientation identities to the “ban the box” movement around criminal records, there continue to be debates about the need to identify students while also not wanting to “box” students into categories that do not reflect the complexities of lived experiences. Yet some categories are necessary for designations (like Hispanic- Serving Institutions and Asian American Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions). We examine these issues from multiple institutional and theoretical perspectives and also explore what happens when we can’t capture particular groups, like transracial adoptee students. Through the sharing of panelists’ expertise across various populations and institutional types, participants will have the opportunity to engage in critical conversations on various forms of “box-checking” in changing sociopolitical landscapes.

PRESENTER(S):

Aeriel Anderson Ashlee, M.Ed., Doctoral Candidate, Educational Leadership Miami University — Cincinnati, OH

Gina Ann Garcia, PhD, Assistant Professor, Administrative and Policy Studies University of Pittsburgh — Pittsburgh, PA

Courtney Johnson, M.S.Ed., Program Coordinator, Office of Diversity and Inclusion Ohio State University — Columbus, OH

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs The Ohio State University — Columbus, OH

Charles S. Sasaki, AM, Dean of Academic Affairs, University of Hawaii – Windward Community College — Honolulu, HI

Finn J. Schneider, M.Ed., Doctoral Student, Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development University of Minnesota — Minneapolis, MN

 

Friday, June 1– 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
4001: Open Space for Multiracial/Multiethnic Student Discussions Session Track: Intersectionality, Identities and Discussions Experience Level: All Levels

This open space session invites participants to engage in an organic conversation about Multiracial/Multiethnic students. The facilitators represent a variety of identities and invite participants to create a safe space for collective activities in the conversation. The open space conversation allows for creativity and leadership among the participants in attendance. Furthermore, open space generates a conversation that is rooted in inquiry, reflection, and learning, which allows individuals to contribute to the collective conversation based on current participant questions/concerns. The facilitators will also assist in guiding the conversation. In this interactive session, participants will bring their voices into this group-guided conversation that will provide spaces for caucus groups, resource sharing, and action planning in support of Multiracial/Multiethnic students. This open space session will benefit any participant who is interested in discussing contemporary issues and challenges for Multiracial/Multiethnic students.

PRESENTER(S):
Victoria K. Malaney Brown, PhD Candidate University of Massachusetts Amherst & Director of Academic Integrity at Columbia University in the City of New York

Sabrina T. Kwist, EdD, Dean of Equity and Inclusion, Los Medanos College

Charmaine Lietzau Wijeyesinghe, EdD, Consultant and Author, Social Justice and Organizational Development — Delmar, NY

 

Friday, June 1– 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
4215: “It’s Sort of Like…”: Using Identity Analogies and Metaphors in Higher Education Session Track: Intersectionality, Identities and Discussions
Experience Level: Intermediate

Drawing upon one’s prior knowledge and understanding of something can be a useful way to make sense of complex ideas, such as the ever-changing landscape of identity. Analogies and metaphors are two common ways that people make connections to things they are familiar with. As Tran and Johnston- Guerrero (2016) articulated, “Both analogies and metaphors are interwoven into our everyday thinking and speech” (p. 135). However, while these rhetorical strategies may be common, the ways some have used them to compare subjects are potentially dangerous. For instance, drawing parallels between transracialism and transgender identity has been highly contested. Yet, what might be learned and explored in drawing parallels between identity experiences, for instance, the racial liminality experienced by transracial adoptees and multiracial individuals? Or in the more specific context of residential life, how might the research on cross-racial roommate relationships speak to the experiences of roommates with differing sexual orientations? This session seeks to explore the potential benefits and dangers of using identity analogies and metaphors in higher education research and practice. As such, participants of this symposium will engage in developing a critical consciousness around identity analogies. This session should particularly benefit educators who have been challenged in how to build understanding across differences, especially among people with marginalized identities/experiences without further marginalizing those populations.

PRESENTER(S):
Aeriel Anderson Ashlee, M.Ed., Doctoral Candidate, Educational Leadership Miami University — Cincinnati, OH

Lisa Combs, MS, Graduate Assistant, Office of Community Engagement and Service Miami University — Oxford, OH

Stephen Deaderick, M.Ed., Assistant Director, Residence Life Tulane University — New Orleans, LA

Alandis Johnson, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Educational Leadership Miami University — Cincinnati, OH

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs The Ohio State University — Columbus, OH

Vu Thanh Tran, PhD, Assistant Director of Residence Education, Residence Education and Housing Services Michigan State University — East Lansing, MI

 

Friday, June 1– 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Session Type: Special Feature
4215: “It’s Sort of Like…”: Using Identity Analogies and Metaphors in Higher Education Session Track: Intersectionality, Identities and Discussions
Experience Level: Intermediate

Drawing upon one’s prior knowledge and understanding of something can be a useful way to make sense of complex ideas, such as the ever-changing landscape of identity. Analogies and metaphors are two common ways that people make connections to things they are familiar with. As Tran and Johnston- Guerrero (2016) articulated, “Both analogies and metaphors are interwoven into our everyday thinking and speech” (p. 135). However, while these rhetorical strategies may be common, the ways some have used them to compare subjects are potentially dangerous. For instance, drawing parallels between transracialism and transgender identity has been highly contested. Yet, what might be learned and explored in drawing parallels between identity experiences, for instance, the racial liminality experienced by transracial adoptees and multiracial individuals? Or in the more specific context of residential life, how might the research on cross-racial roommate relationships speak to the experiences of roommates with differing sexual orientations? This session seeks to explore the potential benefits and dangers of using identity analogies and metaphors in higher education research and practice. As such, participants of this symposium will engage in developing a critical consciousness around identity analogies. This session should particularly benefit educators who have been challenged in how to build understanding across differences, especially among people with marginalized identities/experiences without further marginalizing those populations.

PRESENTER(S):
Aeriel Anderson Ashlee, M.Ed., Doctoral Candidate, Educational Leadership Miami University — Cincinnati, OH

Lisa Combs, MS, Graduate Assistant, Office of Community Engagement and Service Miami University — Oxford, OH

Stephen Deaderick, M.Ed., Assistant Director, Residence Life Tulane University — New Orleans, LA

Alandis Johnson, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Educational Leadership Miami University — Cincinnati, OH

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs The Ohio State University — Columbus, OH

Vu Thanh Tran, PhD, Assistant Director of Residence Education, Residence Education and Housing Services Michigan State University — East Lansing, MI

Friday, June 1st, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Multiracial Happy Hour meeting at Fulton Alley

Spotlight: MRN Awards Winners

Please join us in congratulating this year’s winners of MRN awards:

Multiracial Network Research of the Year Award is presented to

Dra. Aurora Chang

Aurora Chang

For exemplifying cutting-edge research devoted to the enhancement of multiracial education

Once an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala and raised in Richmond, California in a family of eight, Dra. (Doctora) Aurora Chang is now an assistant professor in Teaching and Learning at Loyola University’s School of Education, where she teaches coursework on social justice education, school reform, undocumented students, Chicana Feminist Epistemology, and urban schooling.  Her research focuses on the intersection of education, identity and agency within traditionally marginalized communities. She focuses on undocumented students’ paths of educational survival, resistance and persistence, how these experiences affect the “American” sociopolitical landscape and what educators can do to support them.

Her other research interests include: cultural studies in education, identity, agency and education with a focus on Multiracial & Latina/o students, experiences of female faculty of color and Chicana Feminist Theory.  A graduate of UC Berkeley, Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin, Chang has worked in various roles within the educational field including: a high school English/ESL teacher in California, academic programs director at UC Berkeley’s Early Academic Outreach Program, educational manager at The College Board, student affairs administrator at the University of Texas at Austin and Director of the McNair Scholars Program at Beloit College.  In all of her roles, she has maintained her role as a classroom teacher.

Dra. (Doctora) Aurora Chang is an educator, a scholar and an editor with over twenty peer-reviewed publications in top journals such as the Harvard Educational Review; Race, Ethnicity and Education; and The Urban Review.  Her publications include “Undocumented to Hyperdocumented: A Jornada of Papers, Protection and Ph.D. Status” in the Harvard Educational Review, “Reflections of a Racial Queer” in the Journal of Multicultural Perspectives and “Becoming Academicians: A Critical Ethnographic Analysis of the Figured Worlds of Pre-tenure Female Faculty of Color,” in the Negro Educational Review.  Her latest articles include: Pedagogical Riesgos (Risks): Carving a Mestiza Consciousness Space for a Chicana Feminist Educator and an Undocumented Chicana Student, Undocumented Intelligence: Laying Low by Achieving High as a Good NonCitizen Citizen, Writing for Publication: Latina Faculty/Staff of Color’s Perspectives on Scholarship Production and Figured worlds & American dreams: a nexploration of agency and identity among Latinx undocumented students.

Her first book, The Struggles of Identity, Education, and Agency in the Lives of Undocumented Students: The Burden of Hyperdocumentation, was recently released.  This project weaves together two distinct and powerfully related sources of knowledge: (1) her journey/transition from a once undocumented immigrant from Guatemala to a hyperdocumented academic, and (2) five years of ongoing national research on the identity, education and agency of undocumented college students (Chang, 2014, 2015, 2016).  In interlacing both personal experiences with findings from empirical qualitative research, this book explores practical and theoretical pedagogical, curricular and policy-related discussions around issues that impact undocumented immigrants while provide compelling rich narrative vignettes (both personal and from her study participants). Collectively, these findings support her overall argument that undocumented students’ quest to achieve academically simultaneously cultivates an empowering self-identity while forcing them to involuntarily perform the role of infallible non-citizen citizen.

She identifies as an activist-scholar-educator and is passionate about using her roles as platforms for those who are silenced in the process of schooling.

Multiracial Network Anniversary Award is presented to

Dr. Beth John

Beth John

For exceptional leadership in advancing multiracial awareness in higher education

Beth John has been working in higher education for 17 years.  She is currently the Director of First Year Experience and adjunct faculty member in the Higher Education Leadership Graduate program at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.  Beth also serves as a Dissertation Advisor for the Edgewood College Doctoral program in Educational Leadership.  Beth received her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership with an emphasis in Higher Education from Edgewood College and her M.S. in College Student Personnel from Western Illinois University.  Beth’s primary areas of interest and research include multiracial identity development, first year students, and students in transition.  Beth has been actively involved with ACPA for many years and has held several leadership positions within the Commission for Student Involvement, Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs: MultiRacial Network (MRN), and the Mid-Level Community of Practice.  She has been involved with MRN since 2009 and is a past chair.  Beth serves a co-advisor to the first Mixed Race Student Union (mXd) at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, which was established in 2015.

We will be formally recognizing our award winners during our Open Business Meeting on Tuesday, March 13th, 8:30am-9:30am  in Hilton Americas-Houston – Meeting Room 339B at the annual ACPA Convention in Houston, TX.

$15 for 15 Years

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This year is MRN’s 15th Anniversary at our convention in Houston, TX and we are collecting donations for the first time to fund the following:

  1. Multiracial coalition and advocacy efforts
  2. Educational programming & sharing of best practices
  3. Research scholarships!

If you would like to contribute in support of our 15th anniversary, please follow this link and select “$15 for 15 Years of MRN” as your donation category.

We truly appreciate any financial support you can give!

With gratitude and MRN Love,

Victoria, Michael, Rob, Laura, James, Rachel, Daniella, Annette, & Kelli

Introducing Dr. Jessica Harris, Scholar in Residence

The MRN welcomes Dr. Jessica Harris as this year’s Scholar in Residence. After being approached by the Outgoing Co-Chair, Victoria Malaney, to join the MRN team, Dr. Harris happily accepted. I had the pleasure of asking her some questions about her career, research interests, and involvement in the MRN.

Dr. Harris is currently an Assistant Professor in the Higher Education and Organizational Change division of the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She teaches master’s and doctoral courses including Student Development Theory, Research in Student Affairs, and Race and Racism in Higher Education. While she acknowledges some challenges in navigating the politics of the tenure track as a young woman of color, she finds satisfaction and encouragement in working alongside and cultivating relationships with colleagues and students. Other rewarding aspects of her career include supporting students with their graduate research and the data collection process, which she often finds to be “empowering and cathartic.”

Though we highlight her work on multiraciality, Dr. Harris has had multiple research interests. As she tells the students she works with, research interests can change considerably and evolve over time. For example, before exploring multiraciality, her original interest was to study what she describes as “white undergraduate men’s development of social justice consciousness.” Yet, her multiracial identity became increasingly salient throughout the first year of her PhD program at the University of Denver. This developing multiracial identity shifted her research interests toward an exploration of multiraciality in education. As she puts it, “My research became me-search.”

Currently, she focuses on two different strands of research: multiraciality in higher education and women of color survivors of campus sexual violence. Through her research, she aims to “destabilize interlocking systems of domination that are embedded throughout higher education and work to influence the experiences of people of color on campus,” including students, faculty and staff. For example, she explores how structures of domination influence the experiences of women of color survivors of campus sexual violence.

She was drawn to the MRN because of the much-needed space and opportunity it provides to higher education professionals to have meaningful conversations on multiraciality and racial equity in education.

Welcome to the team. We are excited to work with you!

Annette Girion, MRN Scholarship & Resources Coordinator

 

Follow Dr. Harris on Twitter @DrJessicaHarris.

Check out some of her most recent work on multiraciality in education at the following links:

Multiracial Women Students and Racial Stereotypes on the College Campus: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/663303

 Navigating the academic borderlands as multiracial and trans* faculty members: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17508487.2017.1356340

 Toward a critical multiracial theory in education: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09518398.2016.1162870

Meet the 2017-2018 Leadership Team!

Current Co-Chair: Michael Dixon (He/him/his)

michael-dixonMichael Dixon is in the midst of his seventh year serving as the Chief Diversity Officer and Director of Intercultural Services at Manchester University. He has worked in higher education since 2004 in a variety of departments (intramurals, residential life, multicultural affairs, student activities, admissions, career development & international student support services) at 10 different institutions. He is currently a doctoral candidate (ABD) in Educational Leadership, Higher Education Administration at Indiana State University.  His father is from Jamaica and his mother hails from the collection of islands in southeast Asia (The Philippines).

 

Incoming Co-Chair & Awards Coordinator: Rob Kunicki (He/him/his)

Kunicki_Headshot 2016

Rob Kunicki was born and raised in New York City to a native New Yorker and an Ecuadorian immigrant. A first-generation college student, Rob holds a BSEd in Adolescence Education with a concentration in Mathematics and a MSEd in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from St. John’s University as well as a MA in Higher Education Administration from Stony Brook University. He has experience working in New Student Orientation, First Year Seminar Peer Mentoring, and Fraternity and Sorority Life. Currently, Rob serves as the Assistant Director for Student Success, Assessment, & Enrollment Initiatives at Baruch College of the City University of New York where he has been able to translate his experience in student life to his work with retention and graduation initiatives in Enrollment Management. Rob is driven by his passions for education, exploring cultural identities, leadership development, and equal opportunity and access. He is a self-proclaimed data nerd who works diligently to support his Division to improve the student experience and meet strategic priorities. His interests include traveling, exercising, and binge-watching Netflix.

Outgoing Co-Chair: Victoria Malaney (She/her/hers)

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Victoria K. Malaney is Ph.D. Candidate in the department of Educational Policy, Research and Administration focusing on Higher Education in the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Victoria’s research interests focus on multiracial college students, intergroup dialogue, race, and student activism. Prior to graduate school, Victoria was an AmeriCorps VISTA and VISTA Leader for two years. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Skidmore College and her Master’s degree in Higher Education Administration from UMass Amherst. Victoria is the Current Chair of the American College Personnel Association’s Multiracial Network (MRN). She was formerly the Scholarship and Resources Coordinator and has been in involved with MRN since July 2012.

Social Media Coordinator: Kelli Campa (She/her/hers)

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Kelli Campa is excited to be part of MRN again this year!  She works at SUNY Binghamton as a Resident Director. Originally a California native, she received her Bachelors in Communications from California Lutheran University and her Masters in Higher Education from Iowa State University. In her free time, she loves to travel (both domestically and internationally), is an avid Netflixer, and enjoys hanging out with friends.

 

Secretary: Laura Carroll  (She/her/hers)

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Laura Carroll is an Academic Advisor for the College of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh. She received her Master of Education in College Student Personnel Administration from James Madison University and her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Slippery Rock University. She has been an active member of ACPA for the past 5 years, and is excited to return to the MRN Leadership Team. Initially, her interest in MRN derived from personal experiences as a multiracial individual. After learning several theories in graduate school, she became fascinated with multiracial identity development. She began intentionally reflecting on and exchanging stories with fellow multiracial students, staff, and faculty. She quickly noticed the varied struggles and successes they had in common and those that differed. Through her involvement with MRN, she has enhanced her knowledge of multiracial research and issues within higher education. She has had opportunities to coordinate and execute social and cultural events with some amazing individuals and thoughtful artists. She believes that MRN provides a safe space for multiracial educators and allies to engage in critical dialogue, which she truly values.

“It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.” -Audre Lorde

Historian: Nicole Belisle (She/her/hers)

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Nicole has a BA in Sociology with a minor in Education from UC Santa Cruz. After taking some time to work with elementary youth in the Bay Area she went on to pursue her MA from Teachers College, Columbia University in Sociology and Education with an emphasis in Education Policy. Nicole identifies as Multiracial and Multiethnic and has dedicated much of her higher education studies to supporting Multiracial identity development and promoting diversity through multicultural education. She is Ph.D. student in the joint program at San Diego State University and Claremont Graduate University in Education with an emphasis in Student Affairs and Higher Education. She is extremely excited to join the MRN leadership team as Historian this year, especially with MRN’s 15th Anniversary fast approaching!

Scholarship & Resources Coordinator: Annette Girion  (She/her/hers)

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Annette is currently a Student Services Advisor at Keck School of Medicine of USC, where she advises medical students on their paths to residency. She recently received her MA in Higher Education/Student Affairs from Claremont Graduate University. She has background and interests in undergraduate and graduate career advising, student wellness, and multiracial student experiences.

Publications Coordinator: Daniella Abdin (She/her/hers)

USEDaniella is a second-year graduate student pursuing a Master of Education in Student Personnel in Higher Education from the University of Florida. She serves as a Graduate Hall Director in the “International House” living learning community. She joined MRN in 2017 at her first Convention, fell in love, and is now serving as publications coordinator.
Daniella’s work focuses on supporting students with disabilities and she plans to pursue a future as an occupational therapist.

 

Lead Team Member: Rachel Luna  (She/her/hers)

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Rachel Luna has been connected to MRN since 2010 and is currently on the Leadership Team.  She joined MRN as a graduate student and immediately found a professional and personal home.  She has stayed involved with this community of scholars because she continues to learn with and from our members.  Through her involvement with MRN, she has presented at conferences, hosted webinars, enjoyed socials, read articles, and chatted on social media with some really great folks.  She spends her days as Student Services Coordinator at Samuel Merritt University in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Most nights and weekends, she is wearing her other hat as a second year doctoral student in Higher Ed Leadership at Colorado State University.

Lead Team Member: Beth John  (She/her/hers)

beth-johnBeth John has been working in higher education for 16 years.  She is currently the Director of First Year Experience and adjunct faculty member in the Higher Education Leadership Graduate program at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.  Beth also serves as a Dissertation Advisor for the Edgewood College Doctoral program in Educational Leadership.  Beth received her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership with an emphasis in Higher Education from Edgewood College and her M.S. in College Student Personnel from Western Illinois University.  Beth’s primary areas of interest and research include multiracial identity development, diversity and inclusion, first year students, and students in transition.  Beth has been actively involved with ACPA for many years and has held several leadership positions within the Commission for Student Involvement, Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs: MultiRacial Network (MRN), and the Mid-Level Community of Practice.  She has been involved with MRN since 2009 and is a past chair.  Beth serves a co-advisor to the first Mixed Race Student Union (mXd) at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, which was established in 2015.