Monthly Archives: January 2012

The Loving Story – HBO Screening Event

It is a rare occasion for Marc Johnston, MRN Chair, and Heather Lou, MRN Incoming Chair, to find themselves in the same city outside of the annual ACPA Convention. So what do these two fun-loving higher education and student affairs administrators choose to do when they are reunited in the City of Angels? They attend the amazing HBO Screening of Nancy Buirski’s The Loving Story (2011) at the Simon Wiesenthal Museum of Tolerance, of course!

On a recent evening in LA, Marc and Heather settled into their seats to view the story of Richard and Mildred Loving – an interracial couple arrested and exiled from Virginia in 1958 for violating anti-miscegenation laws. The documentary captured footage of the couple’s relationship, family, challenges, and triumphs – including the monumental 1967 Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court case, which struck down anti-miscegenation laws in the 15 states that still had them, legalizing interracial marriage across all of the United States. Read the rest of this entry

The “What Are You” Question – Alive and Well

By Takara Larsen, MRN Secretary and Historian

Recently, I was at a social event where the only person I knew was a co-worker.
Though everyone else there was new to me, it didn’t stop these new acquaintances
from asking me variations of the question I’ve fielded my whole life—the “What Are
You” question. Read the rest of this entry

A Plea for Greater Multiracial Discourse

By Adam Ortiz, MRN Publications Coordinator

Last night I typed the word “multiracial” into my Google search bar. I have been looking for more multiracial resources recently and thought this broad search might yield useful results. I was surprised to see on the first page of links my latest post on this blog – written in September 2011. This may not seem alarming at first, but is noteworthy considering I share the internet with the ENTIRE PLANET. I’m also neither prolific nor an expert. It made me feel as though, in ratio to the innumerable who identify, not too many people in cyberspace are writing about multiracial issues. Read the rest of this entry