Meet MRN @ NCORE 2016! Highlighted Sessions

If you’re going to the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity (NCORE) in San Francisco this coming week, we hope to see you at some of the these amazing sessions focused on various aspects of multiraciality. Below we have highlighted several sessions that feature past and current MRN Leadership Team members and friends.

WEDNESDAY

Red and Yellow, Black and Brown: Researching Mixed Race Experiences that Decenter Whiteness

Special Feature, Session #2423
Wednesday, June 1
3:00 ‒ 4:30 p.m.
Union Square 14, Tower 3, Fourth Floor

Abstract:

Although the scholarship on multiraciality has increased steadily over the years, there is still a lack of understanding multiracial identity and experiences for people of multiple minoritized racial backgrounds. This panel presentation features researchers across different disciplines (e.g., history, sociology, communication, ethnic studies) who focus on mixed race populations that decenter whiteness.  From histories of African American/Indian and Mexipino populations to contemporary identities of Blaxicans and portrayals of Black-Asian interracial relationships in popular media, the panelists will share their personal stories that led them to their research areas as well as findings from various projects that add to our understandings of multiplicity and intersectionality in relation to mixed race subjects. This session is part of larger conversation within Critical Mixed Race Studies that will be featured in a forthcoming book on the topic. Participants will be invited to share their own stories and experiences with decentering whiteness within multiracial identity toward better understanding the diversity of multiracial students, staff, faculty, and community members.

Presented by:

Ingrid Dineen-Wimberly, PhD, Sr. Adjunct Professor, History Department, University of La Verne, Pt. Mugu Campus – Oxnard, CA

Rudy P. Guevarra, PhD, Associate Professor, Asian Pacific American Studies, Arizona State University – Tempe, AZ

Charlene C. Martinez, MA, Associate Director, Diversity and Cultural Engagement, Oregon State University – Corvallis, OR

Rebecca Romo, PhD, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Philosophy and Social Sciences, Santa Monica College – Sylmar, CA

Myra S. Washington, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico – Albuquerque, NM

 

THURSDAY

Supporting Multiracial Students Across Institutional and Regional Contexts: PWIs, MSIs, and the Regional (Multi)racial Landscape in Higher Education

Special Feature, Session #3514
Thursday, June 2
4:45 ‒ 6:00 p.m.
Union Square 15&16, Tower 3, Fourth

Abstract:

Much of the current literature and knowledge base on supporting multiracial college students comes from predominately white institution (PWI) contexts. However, the landscape of higher education institutions continues to diversify, including colleges and university classified as Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). This session examines the importance of considering diverse institutional and regional contexts for supporting multiracial students. Panelists will share their expertise on various institutional types, including Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and how the unique contexts offer both challenges and opportunities for better supporting multiracial students. Additionally, different regions of the United States will be incorporated to add another level of understanding to the multiple layers of contexts influencing multiracial students today. Participants will have opportunities to share their own experiences navigating diverse institutional and regional contexts.

Presented by:

Gina A. Garcia, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Administrative and Policy Studies, University of Pittsburgh School of Education – Pittsburg, PA

Victoria Malaney, MEd, Special Assistant to the Dean of Students, Student Affairs and Campus Life, University of Massachusetts Amherst – Amherst, MA

Robert T. Palmer, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Howard University – Washington, D.C. (Participating Virtually)

Charles Sasaki, Dean of Academic Affairs, University of Hawaii – Windward Community College – Honolulu, HI

 

FRIDAY

Is Race a Choice? A Conversation on (Multi)Racial Identification Fluidity and Ethnic Fraud in a post-Dolezal Context

Special Feature, Session #4112
Friday, June 3
10:00 ‒ 11:30 a.m.
Union Square 3&4, Tower 3, Fourth Floor

Abstract:

Spotlighted in Maria Root’s (1996) often-cited Bill of Rights for Racially Mixed People, the right to self-identify among multiracial people has been underlined by the notion that racial identity is a choice. Many bira­cial and multiracial people have taken this sense of choice to heart, racially identifying themselves differently across time and depending on the situation. In this session, we engage the question: to what extent is race a choice? Scholars from multiple disciplines (e.g., education, ethnic studies, sociology) will explore answers to this question within changing dynamics of racial identification across various contexts (e.g., criminal justice, health care) and implications for higher education. Such dynamics are evidenced by an increase in racial fluidity, or the phenomenon where one’s race is malleable and flexibly claimed across different contexts. Racial fluidity is most often associated with a mixed heritage or multiracial identity, but has also been documented among monoracial people and those who may identify as something other than their heritage, potentially resulting in claims of ethnic fraud. Such was the case highlighted by the media attention to Rachel Dolezal in June 2015. We invite participants to engage in an imperative conversation exploring beliefs about self-identity, social norms guiding racial identification, and the contextual influences highlighting whether one views choosing race to be representative of fluidity or some sort of fraud.

Presented by:

Gina A. Garcia, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Administrative and Policy Studies, University of Pittsburgh School of Education – Pittsburg, PA

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs, The Ohio State University, Columbus – Columbus, OH

Andrew Jolivette, PhD, Professor and Chair, American Indian Studies Department, San Francisco State University – San Francisco, CA

Aliya Saperstein, PhD, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Stanford University – Stanford, CA

Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe, EdD, Consultant and Author, Organizational Development and Social Justice Education – Delmar, NY

 

It’s All in the Mix: New Models for Understanding and Engaging Multiracial Students and Alumni

Special Feature, Session #4422
Friday, June 3
Friday, 3:00 ‒ 4:30 p.m.
Union Square 3&4, Tower 3, Fourth Floor

Abstract:

The 2010 U.S. Census reported nearly 50% more multiracial children than the 2000 census, making the “two or more races” youth demographic one of the fastest growing of all reported racial groups. With such growth, institutions of higher education will continue to see increasing enrollments of multiracial students, many who have only known their ability to “check all that apply.” Yet, the social structures at many institutions have resisted explicit and intentional engagement of mixed students. New models are needed to better understand and engage this often overlooked population before, during, and after college. This session takes a lifespan approach considering how, for instance, various social media representations might influence the identities of multiracial students even before they get to college. While during college, research continues to make clear that mixed student organizations can help engage students, fostering community and identity development. But what happens on campuses without such organizations? The session will also spotlight staff-initiated services and retreats, as well as mixed race studies curriculum development, as models for engaging multiracial students both in and out of the classroom. Finally, the session will feature lessons learned from one of the first affinity associations for mixed alumni. Overall, the panelists will share their experiences with supporting mixed race students and alumni through various models. Participants will be invited to share their own perspectives to create shared learning about ways to apply aspects of the models presented to their own contexts.

Presented by:

Rudy P. Guevarra, PhD, Associate Professor, Asian Pacific American Studies, Arizona State University – Tempe, AZ

Jenifer K. Logia, BA, Outreach Coordinator, County Manager’s Office, San Mateo County – Redwood City, CA

Heather C. Lou, MEd, Assistant Director of Outreach, Women’s Resources and Research Center, University of California, Davis – Oakland, CA

Victoria Malaney, MEd, Special Assistant to the Dean of Students, Student Affairs and Campus Life, University of Massachusetts Amherst – Amherst, MA

Charlene C. Martinez, MA, Associate Director, Diversity and Cultural Engagement, Oregon State University – Corvallis, OR

 

[And join us after the session for the Multiracial Network (MRN) and UCLA’s Mixed Alumni Association joint Mixed/Multiracial Social at the restaurant Mortimer @ 5:00pm]

 

SATURDAY

Exploring Multiple Layers of Privilege and Oppression within the Multiracial Experience: Microaggressions and Beyond

Special Feature, Session #5112
Saturday, June 4
10:00 ‒ 11:30 a.m.
Union Square 3&4, Tower 3, Fourth Floor

Abstract:

As efforts to better understand the social forces affecting multiracial peoples continue, more attention is needed to complicating the multiple ways privilege and oppression manifest for mixed race students. This session will highlight advancements in theorizing monoracism, a system of oppression targeting those who do not adhere to society’s promotion of discrete monoracial categories, and understanding multiracial microaggressions, those subtle, everyday and often unintended experiences with discrimination that multiracial people face. Moreover, multiple and intersecting identities will be contemplated, including intersections of sexuality and gender with multiraciality. Panelists will share personal and scholarly insights on moving research and practice on the multiracial experience forward to better capture complexities associated with privilege and oppression. Participants will learn about the importance of understanding multiple and intersecting layers of privilege and oppressions when developing programs and services for multiracial students.

Presented by:

Eric Hamako, EdD, Multicultural Instructor, Equity & Social Justice, Shoreline Community College – Shoreline, WA

Jessica C. Harris, PhD, Visiting Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, The University of Kansas – Lawrence, KS

Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero, PhD, Assistant Professor, Higher Education and Student Affairs, Ohio State University, Columbus – Columbus, OH

Heather C. Lou, MEd, Assistant Director of Outreach, Women’s Resources and Research Center, University of California, Davis – Oakland, CA

 

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Posted on May 29, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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