Blog Archives

Join the 2017-2019 MRN Leadership Team!

Are you interested in multiracial issues?  Are you looking for ways to take action?  Are you excited to connect with folks like you?  If so, come on board and join the Multiracial Network team!

You can present programs, plan socials, write blogs, and so much more as a Leadership Team Member.  Please fill out the form below and email us your resume to cma_mrn@acpa.nche.edu to apply!

Join our team by filling out the brief application below.  We’ll be in contact soon after that date to get you connected with MRN involvement opportunities.

We can’t wait to meet you!

The Multiracial Network

Victoria, James, Rachel, Laura, Michael, Annette, Kelli, & Rob

 

 

Webinar: Race Policy & Multiracial Americans

Join the Multiracial Network in a hour long webinar discussion on Friday, October 28th with Dr. Kathleen Odell Korgen (Editor) and Dr. Marc Johnston-Guerrero (Chapter author) as they discuss in the first book to offer a closer look at the effects of multiracial citizens on race-related policies.

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Registration link:  gotowebinar.com/register/9102985786355176193

Webinar is open for all and is free!

 Downloadable mrn-webinar flyer.

“As the number of people who identify as multiracial is growing rapidly, policies that relate to race continue to lag behind, failing to properly account for the ways that a multiracial citizenry complicates programs aimed at mitigating the effects of racism, ameliorating past discrimination, and more. The book takes up key questions relating to the intersection of race-based policies, social welfare, education, and multiracial citizens, while drawing on tools and techniques from a range of fields to present a picture of where we’re at today and what possible steps are needed to create more effective and more inclusive policies in the future.”

Purchase the book and get 20% off of the price by using code PR20RACE

Five Ways to Increase Multiracial Discourse on Your Campus

By Adam Ortiz  
Since joining the field of Student Affairs in 2008, I have found one common trait among all of the institutions for which I have worked: at each, there are multiracial-identified students (and, generally, staff and faculty as well) who desire to connect with others who share similar experiences. Here are five simple ways to increase multiracial discourse on your campus:
1. Put yourself out there. If you identify as multiracial, talk about your experiences when appropriate. If you are involved with groups like the Multiracial Network or if you are interested in scholarly research on multiracial identity, be open about it when the opportunity presents itself. You never know who else in the room has a shared experience or knows a student who is looking for support.
2. Connect with colleagues. If you do not work closely with your Cultural / Diversity Student Center (or campus equivalent), get to know the staff and students who work there. Oftentimes, these staff will be in the know about particular students who are interested in multiracial identity or even in starting a multiracial student group. Attend events and offer your support where needed and if wanted.
3. If one doesn’t exist, start a multiracial student group on your campus. And don’t feel like you need to be complex about it! Sometimes just creating an informal space for students to come together will provide much-needed and much-appreciated solidarity. You can start by making posters, asking your colleagues to spread the word, and providing snacks. See an article co-written by MRN Chair, Victoria Malaney & Kendra Danowski for tips!
4. Host a dialogue on related multiracial topics. If you don’t have the time to commit to starting a full student group, consider facilitating a dialogue or dialogue series addressing topics pertinent to multiracial students. This is even more effective if you can find a small group of students to help develop the dialogue and advertise. Topics that I have seen work include family, friendships, romantic relationships, privilege, and Whiteness.
5. Create room for multiracial discourse in social justice trainings. Whether the conversation is focused on microaggressions, affinity spaces, or intersections, find ways to ensure that multiracial identity is visible. There are numerous social justice-related topics that pertain to multiracial students (monoracism, passing and privilege, and racial fluidity, for example). Creating opportunities to process them will help students to think critically about their identities and likely feel more connected with their peers.
If you have other ideas, please share them with us!
acpa.mrn@gmail.com

Bringing in 2016 with Reflections on “American” History

By Laura Carroll, MRN Leadership Team

In higher education, Winter Recess brings time for reflection, relaxation, and reconnection with family, friends, and self.  What I love about this time of year is ice skating, catching the latest movie release, family dinners, and trips to the museum.  As the nation commemorates the 75th anniversary of World War II, the local museum featured an exhibit that focused on the region’s role during the war.  As I walked through the exhibit, I remembered the stories that my late grandfather told me of his experience growing up during the war.  The photographs and models sparked a feeling of connection to him, like I finally had a physical representation of the images he so colorfully painted in his stories.  According to the exhibit, our region had a tremendous impact during the war, but we endured much pain and struggle.

Midway through, I noticed that my fiance was not experiencing the same feelings of connection to the exhibit.  They brought to my attention the minimal recognition given to the African Americans who contributed to the war efforts, and no recognition of African American women.  They shared feelings of sadness, anger, isolation, and rejection that their ancestors were not represented.  Not long after, I overheard a tour guide answer a visitor’s question with: “…we did have several artifacts, but they were very racist and we weren’t allowed to incorporate them into the exhibit.”

As a multiracial individual who identifies as BOTH Black (African American) and White (Scotch Irish), I had several reactions in that moment.  First, I felt concern for my fiance and the continuous impact of visiting museums that fail to acknowledge America’s oppressive past and present.  Second, like so many times in my life, I felt caught between the long-standing tension of my ancestors.  Consistently, “American” History Museums are very White and we must go to the African American History Museums to see our culture represented and celebrated.  Very rarely will multiracial individuals be identified in any history museums, at least none that I have visited throughout the east coast.

Two weeks later, I’ve had some time to process this experience.  It saddens me that people of color are rarely included when we commemorate “American” history.  The three brief references in the 10,000 square foot exhibition, included one wax figure of a Tuskegee Airman, a diagram of the estimated racial demographics of soldiers (5% African American and 1% other), and one small square case with a pin from the “Double V Campaign”. After further research at home, I learned that the Double V Campaign was a motivational symbol created by African Americans to start a movement for victory abroad at war and equal rights in the United States.  At present, the fight for equal rights and respect, remains.

In an effort to find a sense of community in this city, I searched an electronic database of over 700 local affinity groups. I was glad to find a handful of groups and organizations that support and celebrate African Americans. However, not surprisingly, my search for biracial/multiracial resulted in zero results (not even at the universities).  Despite the lack of inclusion within society at large, I’m thankful to be a part of MRN.  This truly is a community of thoughtful individuals who engage in dialogue, readings, research, and events to raise awareness, educate, and provide support…creating a sense of belonging.

I find that writing this blog was very therapeutic and it became more exciting as I continued to express my/our experience through text.  I would love to hear some of your experiences and feedback. Has a visit to a history museum sparked reflections of your heritage? Is there an organization in your local area (or at your institution) that does great work for the multiracial community? Have you and your partner or relative had a conversation about your racial identities and representation (or lack of, or misrepresentation) within society?

About the Author:
Laura is an Academic Advisor in the College of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh.  She has been involved with MRN since her first ACPA Convention in 2011.  In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her fiance, their cat, and fish; hanging out with family and friends, attending cultural events, and dancing.

Get involved with MRN!

Are you interested in multiracial issues?  Are you looking for ways to take action?  Are you excited to connect with folks like you?  If so, come on board and join the Multiracial Network team!

You can present programs, plan socials, write blogs, and so much more as either a Leadership Team Member or Active Affiliate.  Let us know what you’re interested in doing and how much time you’d like to commit, and we will work with you to find a role in MRN that best fits you.

Join our team by filling out the brief application below by July 24.  We’ll be in contact soon after that date to get you connected with your MRN involvement opportunities.

You can also access this application in a new window if you prefer.

Sign up for the Bone Marrow Donor Registry with MRN at #ACPA15

By Rachel Luna & Victoria Malaney

At the ACPA15 convention in Tampa, the Multiracial Network (MRN) is engaging in advocacy by inviting people to register with Be the Match for the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry, as this is a major health issue for people afflicted with certain life-threatening diseases and who come from diverse backgrounds.  At the same time, we recognize that this organization is required to adhere to current FDA regulations that are discriminatory toward “men who have had sex with another man” and those who identify as trans*.

Patients are most likely to match someone who shares their ancestry

Donors who are mixed race and from diverse backgrounds are in demand for the National Bone Marrow Donor registry

Why this important for mixed folks and folks of diverse backgrounds?

Every year, over 30,000 people are diagnosed in the US with life threatening blood diseases like leukemia. For many patients, a bone marrow transplant is their only chance at survival. Only 30% of patients find matching donors within their families. The remaining 70% must search for an unrelated donor. On US’s national Be The Match Registry, a total of 30% of donors are minorities and 3% of potential donors self-identify as mixed race. Though this approximately matches U.S. Census data, more mixed-race donors are needed given the sheer genetic diversity of the group (Statistics from MixedMarrow.org).

What is particularly challenging for mixed-race individuals is that theNational Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) is unable to provide a patient and their family the likelihood of finding a match for patients of mixed heritage. However, the greatest challenge for finding a match is that the growing community of racially and ethnically diverse people have tissue types that are very complex making it harder to match. The chance that two people from two different groups will create a new tissue type in children is very high. This is why there is such a great need for donors from all backgrounds to join the Be The Match Registry – to increase the likelihood that all patients will find a match  (Statistics from MixedMarrow.org).

Acknowledging discriminatory policies

We are working to hold the dissonance between advocating for a need in our populations and working within a discriminatory institutional system and medical complex.  We plan to confront the incongruence of social justice values in these ways:

  • Be transparent about the FDA regulations, the organization’s response, and MRN’s opposition to the discriminatory policies;
  • Write an open letter from MRN to the FDA advocating for policy change; and,
  • Share sample letters and resources with other professionals wishing to contact the FDA.

Additionally, we seek to find ways to partner to create space for dialogue on this issue with our larger ACPA community. We are open to continuing the conversation during and after convention to address the complexity of intersections of race, sexuality, and gender, and challenging systems that are inherently oppressive.

Take action and more info

Mixed Marrow Logo

Find more information about bone marrow donation and the needs within multiracial populations with Mixed Marrow and Be The Match

MRN at #ACPA15

We are very excited to Consider. Collaborate. Create. Commit. with everyone who is joining us at the ACPA15 Convention in Tampa, FL.  For those who are able, please join MRN at our events:

Wednesday, March 4

MRN Pre-Convention Social 3/5 at 9:30

Join MRN at our ACPA15 Pre-Convention Social, Wed. March 4 at 9:30pm at Jackson’s Bistro Bar and Sushi.

Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) Pre-Convention Social

Marriott Tampa Waterside – Florida Salon IV @ 8:30-9:30pm

MRN Pre-Convention Social

Jackson Bistro & Sushi, Island Bar Area @ 9:30pm

Thursday, March 5

CelebrACPA Opening Event

Tampa Convention Center – Central and West Hall @ 6-7pm

CultureFest: A Demand for Justice

Tampa Convention Center – Ballroom A @ 7-8:15pm

Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) Social

Tampa Convention Center – Ballroom A @ 8:15-10pm

Friday, March 6

Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) Open Business Meeting

Tampa Convention Center – Room 30B @ 9:30-10:30am

Multiracial Network (MRN) Block Social

Marriott Tampa Waterside – Florida Salon II @ 9:30-11pm

Saturday, March 7

Multiracial Network (MRN) Open Business Meeting

Tampa Convention Center – Room 32 @ 12:30-1:30pm


We also love folks who are joining us in spirit, so please join us virtually by following @ACPA_MRN on Twitter, liking our Facebook page, and following hashtags like #ACPA15 and #MRNatACPA on your social media.

MRN at CMRS 2014

Are you attending the 2014 Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference at DePaul University in Chicago?  If so, check out these sessions featuring current and former members of the MRN Leadership Team:

Thursday, November 13

9:45am-11:15am at Room #314A

PANEL: Multiracial Students: Education, Discrimination, and Innovation

  • CHAIR: Eric Hamako, Shoreline Community College
  • Negotiating Privilege and Oppression: Monoracism’s Influence on Mixed College Student Identities – Marc P. Johnston, The Ohio State University
  • Recognizing & Remedying Monoracism in Anti-racist Education – Eric Hamako, Shoreline Community College
  • Institutional Struggles with Monoracism: Complicating Admissions Decisions and Data – Kristina Wong Davis, The Ohio State University

Saturday, November 15

10:45am-12:15pm at Room 380

PANEL: Postsecondary Mixed Race Student Experience

  • CHAIR: Sara Furr, DePaul University
  • Integration and Student Housing Choices: Inside Campus Multicultural Living Communities – Nicole Elasser Watson, Syracuse University
  • Creating Safe Spaces for Mixed Race Students – Kaily Heitz, Independent Scholar
  • 10 Ways to Support Multiracial Students – Victoria Malaney, American College Personnel Association’s Multiracial Network
  • Multiracial Students and the Pathway to a STEM Major – Mette Evelyn Bjerre, University of Notre Dame

1:30pm-3:00pm at Room 314 A/B

ROUNDTABLE: The Lived Experiences of Contemporary Mixed Race Couples in the U.S.

  • CHAIR: Ken Tanabe, Loving Day
  • Kelley R. Kenney, Kutztown University
  • Mark E. Kenney, Chestnut Hill College/DeSales University
  • Beth John, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
  • Benjamin John, Rush Wisconsin Soccer Club
  • Steven Riley, MixedRaceStudies.org
  • Julia Cates, MixedRaceStudies.org

We send positive vibes to everyone at CMRS 2014, and special shoutouts to Marc, Victoria, Beth, and Ben for contributing their stories and scholarship to the mixed race conversation.  Follow along with their adventures by connecting with MRN on Facebook and Twitter.

CMRS 2014 Banner

MRN is proud to have current and former Leadership Team members presenting at the 3rd Biennial CMRS Conference.

Now What? A Webinar About Getting Involved in ACPA

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Inspired by an exciting and reinventing ACPA14 Convention, the Multiracial Network (MRN) hosted this webinar to share stories and tips for getting involved in entity groups without ACPA.

Panelists include:

* Brian Arao (Past-Chair for Commission for Social Justice Educators); 
* Beth John (Past-Chair for Multiracial Network and Member of Mid-Level Managers Group);
* Bernie Liang (Past-Chair for Asian Pacific American Network and Convention Planning Team); 
* Heather C. Lou (Past-Chair for Multiracial Network); 
* Rachel Luna (Current-Chair for Multiracial Network and Past-Coordinator for Sponsored Programs in Standing Committee for Graduate Students and New Professionals); and, 
* Windi Sasaki (Past-Chair of Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs, Past-Chair for Asian Pacific American Network, Convention Planning Team)

We have created a recap of the webinar here and hope that you will check it out!

Please let us know if you would like to participate in future MRN-sponsored webinars, or if you have ideas for new ones!

-Multiracial Network

 

MRN is Getting Social!

 

Happy Autumn, MRN!

On November 7th, members of the MRN leadership team will be hosting a social in Amherst, Massachusetts.  As one of the coordinators for this event, I am really excited about the opportunity to connect with other professionals in the Pioneer Valley about various multiracial initiatives, issues on campus, and related topics.

The idea for this social stemmed from a conversation that some of us had about utilizing MRN as a tool for bringing people together to talk about multiracial topics. As a group with a large leadership team and broad member base, MRN can be a way for professionals in higher education to network socially and professionally.

We hope to accomplish this by creating spaces where people can gather and feel comfortable bringing whatever they want to the table. Some people may focus more on academic research while others may want to process tangible ways to program in the context of student activities. What matters most is that ideas are being generated and that connections are being made!  

If you live in the Pioneer Valley region, we would love to see you at our event on November 7th. If you cannot make it to ours, we would like to support you in hosting an MRN social in your own region. We are happy to offer you the resources necessary to plan for these spaces, advertise, and hopefully build new relationships with local colleagues. Please contact us if you want our help!

If you are interested in coming to the MRN social on November 7th, the details are as follows:

MRN Amherst Social

High Horse Brewery and Bistro

Thursday, November 7th

7pm-9pm

RSVP by November 5th to acpa_mrn@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing you there!

-Adam

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